Countdown – the school some ways to make money magazine

After reading the story, discuss how the author used differences in how the characters what are some ways to make money spoke to give us information about the characters. Draw attention to the descriptions of ahab speaking in a what are some ways to make money ‘deep voice’, ‘bellowing’ and ‘booming’; shasta talking to herself about different ideas as she prepares what are some ways to make money for her cooking on pages 7 and 8; and bob using homely and invented words like ’indeedy’ and ’otter-acious’ and leaving off the final sound of some words.

Ask for volunteers to dramatise reading some of the dialogue what are some ways to make money from the text, representing each character with multiple readers. Then ask students to form small groups and write a what are some ways to make money dialogue among the three characters that the students think might what are some ways to make money happen as the characters are setting off to explore the what are some ways to make money island. Encourage students to use the individual speech characteristics noted in what are some ways to make money their analysis section. Have each group perform their dialogue for the rest of what are some ways to make money the class. Cliffhangers: analyse, then write your own

The first part of this serial story ends with a what are some ways to make money cliffhanger—some hungry lizards who have a taste for one of what are some ways to make money the main characters are spotted in the foliage. Have students identify the cliffhanger situation. Discuss what purpose it serves and whether they think it what are some ways to make money is effective. Brainstorm other cliffhangers the class has encountered in their reading what are some ways to make money and viewing. The episodes of both comic serials in this issue also what are some ways to make money have cliffhanger endings—students can compare and contrast these, providing arguments for which they think is more effective and what are some ways to make money why.

Demonstrate how a story could be turned into a serial what are some ways to make money with a cliffhanger ending by editing ’lots of latkes’ to end the first instalment when the family has finished what are some ways to make money the latkes and the doorbell rings with the guests arriving. Have students, individually or in groups, create a two-part story with a cliffhanger from the story ‘stripe’. Onomatopoeia

Have students go on a word hunt in the story what are some ways to make money to find examples of onomatopoeia and record (manually or digitally) the words or phrases they find together with the category what are some ways to make money of sound. Some great examples include ‘BOB-OTTER, BOB-OTTER, BOB-OTTER’ and ‘chugged’ to describe the engine noise, ‘clacked’ to represent the sound of shasta’s beak opening and shutting and ‘squawked’ to portray the sound of shasta speaking to herself.

Extension: assemble some clips or live-action demonstrations of sound effects related to the story. For instance, otters and boats make splashing sounds as in the ‘water splashing sound effects’ clip, or ‘brolga trumpeting’ from the auckland zoo. Ask students to come up with their own onomatopoeic words what are some ways to make money and phrases to describe the sounds they hear. Compare results and discuss how different people (and different cultures) represent the same sounds in different ways.

Intertextuality: use the scaffold in the poem ‘watching through the windows’ page 9, to write about an aspect from the story ‘the swimming lions’, be it landscape, the animals, hunting or anything else that the story that resonates with what are some ways to make money students. Appropriate the poem using the structure, imagery and even the title if it works, to write another poem. Explore further the english textual concept intertextuality

Create a script, for a news reporter interviewing a scientist who has studied what are some ways to make money the swimming lions. The text makes specific reference to the adaptations these lions what are some ways to make money have made to survive. Highlight the parts of the text that lend themselves to what are some ways to make money questions. Use a question creation chart to support students. Option to use imovie or microsoft movie maker.

Conduct an I used to think … But now I think … routine to help students to reflect on their thinking about what are some ways to make money a topic or issue and explore how and why that what are some ways to make money thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students what are some ways to make money identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I used to think … now I think … worksheet.

Conduct a see, think, wonder thinking routine to explore the title and predictions about what are some ways to make money ‘connecting the dots’, using the image on page 9 as stimulus. This routine encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful what are some ways to make money interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. Use student see think wonder worksheet to record responses.

Journal: write a journal entry titled, ‘when I grow up …’. Lots of jobs face challenges and require real problem-solving strategies. The postman and the mean dog is a common hurdle, which required communication skills more than problem solving. Ask students to communicate their ideas about what kind of what are some ways to make money jobs they see themselves doing in the future, the skills they have, or will need to have, and the hurdles they may encounter.

Conduct an I used to think … But now I think … routine to help students to reflect on their thinking about what are some ways to make money a topic or issue and explore how and why that what are some ways to make money thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students what are some ways to make money identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I used to think … now I think … worksheet.

Create a story arc of the main events in ‘dad likes to cook’, to highlight the narrative conventions used by the author, dale harcombe. For background information on story arcs, you can read using a story arc to find and what are some ways to make money summarise a theme or watch this introduction to the story what are some ways to make money arc youtube clip. How does dale create suspense? (what will dad cook next?) what role do humour and imagination play in the story what are some ways to make money to carry the plot? How does the author engage the audience? Explore further the english textual concept ‘narrative’.

Describe dad using this show your thinking® character traits worksheet. Show your thinking® is a framework developed to guide students as they develop what are some ways to make money and practice their critical thinking skills when writing short constructed what are some ways to make money responses. Students list dad’s characteristics and support their inferences and ideas using evidence what are some ways to make money from the text.

Conduct an I used to think … But now I think … routine to help students to reflect on their thinking about what are some ways to make money a topic or issue and explore how and why that what are some ways to make money thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students what are some ways to make money identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I used to think … now I think … worksheet.

Character: complete a character development worksheet to illustrate how sheryl gwyther what are some ways to make money reveals clues to help students get to know the characters what are some ways to make money in ‘duck for dinner’. This character development worksheet helps students focus and analyse four what are some ways to make money ways in which an author develops characters. Explore further the english textual concept ‘narrative’.

Intertextuality: create a persuasive flow chart or infographic, using canva, about the importance of safety and first aid, especially in australia, where five of the world’s ten deadliest snakes live. Scaffold arguments using this persuasion map worksheet to organise thinking what are some ways to make money and slogan generation . Adapting structure and styles of texts draws on the english what are some ways to make money textual concept ‘intertextuality’, where texts can be appropriated for audience, purpose, mode or media.

Conduct an I used to think … But now I think … routine to help students to reflect on their thinking about what are some ways to make money a topic or issue and explore how and why that what are some ways to make money thinking has changed. It can be useful in consolidating new learning as students what are some ways to make money identify their new understandings, opinions, and beliefs. Record responses on this I used to think … now I think … worksheet.

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